Tulor

Tulor is located in the region of Antofagasta. The distance from Tulor to Chile’s capital Santiago (Santiago) is approximately 1,186 km and the site is also known as the archaeological capital of Chile.

Preservation

In 2009, the Chilean government initiated a project for the creation of a preservation plan for the ancient village. Protective caps were installed to guard the ancient earthen walls against erosion. Unfortunately, the site was vandalized in April 2010. According to Chile’s Consejo de Monumentos Nacionales, this was the worst damage to the site in decades. In November 2010 the office of CONAF at Tulor was set on fire.

Discovery

Father Gustavo el Paige, is the discoverer of Tulor.

Settlement

The city was occupied by 800BC, and at its peak had several hundred inhabitants. There are few artifacts on hand at the site, but photographers will find the enigmatic earthworks a tempting subject, particularly in the morning or late afternoon.

Findings

Tulor’s discovery consist of many items including:-

Boreholes

Boreholes are the circular walls made out of clay, dug into the earth to find water.

Tulor-6

Honeycomb

A human-sized honeycomb of square and circular adobe structures

How Did It End

The stratigraphy helped in finding out why the population disappeared ,which was not due by climatic changes but to an increase in drought. On site they found lithic, human bones, animal bones, ceramic, carbon, and seashells buried in the ground which somehow confirms the manner of end.

Settled 2,500 years ago and located in an ancient oasis once supported by the San Pedro River, Tulor Village is the most important of a suite of ancient villages in the Atacama Desert. The site, which has numerous circular adobe structures surrounded by a perimeter wall, was abandoned ca. a.d. 300 when the oasis dried up and dunes advanced. Since 1998 the site has been managed as an Eco-tourism destination, yet little has been done to preserve Tulor, resulting in damage to the archaeological remains through erosion, sand encroachment, and lack of maintenance.

 

 

 

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