Ephesus

Ephesus

Ephesus was an ancient Greek city in Tureky, built in the 10th century BC and used to be among the 12 twelve cities of the Ionian League during the Classical Greek era. The city flourished after it came under the control of the Roman Republic in 129 BC.

Population

Ephesus had a population of 33,600 to 56,000 people in the Roman period.

Significance

It was the 3rd largest city of Roman Asia Minor.

Ephesus was one of the 7 churches of Asia that are cited in the Book of Revelation

The Gospel of John may have been written here.

Excavation

Excavations started in 1863 by British architect John Turtle Wood, sponsored by British Museum

Area

The ruins are spread along the slopes of 2 hills, with 2 level sites in between connected by the sloping Street of Curettes.

Origin

Ephesus was founded by the Greeks.

To see
Temple of Artemis

It is one of the 7 Wonders of the Ancient World and was in Ephesus

Temple of Artemis

The Terrace Houses

These houses were the residency of wealthy people during Roman period

The Terrace Houses

Mary’s House

The house of Virgin Mary is considered to be the last home of Mother Mary. The Christians visit here for pilgrimage and it has been also visited by the last 3 popes.

Mary’s House

Basilica of St. John

When St. John, the Apostle died, he was buried and a church was built over his grave-site, which was later developed into a great basilica.

Basilica of St. John

Isa Bey Mosque

It was constructed in 1374-5 and is one of the oldest masterpiece

İsa Bey Mosque

The Seven Sleepers

The tomb of 7 young men who were encased in the Northern slopes of Mount Pion is also in Ephesus

Tomb of the Seven Sleepers

Ephesus Museum

There is no better place to learn about the history of Ephesus than at the museum, where artifacts are prominently displayed and items are carefully preserved to keep the history alive.

Ephesus Museum

The library of Celsus

It is an ancient Roman building in Ephesus, Anatolia, now part of Selcuk, Turkey

The library of Celsus

Grand Theatre

The biggest construction’s remaining in Ephesus with a capacity to seat 25,000 people.

Grand Theatre

Odeon

This building has the shape of a small theatre with a stage building, seating places and the orchestra. It was used for the meetings of the Boulea or the Senate and was also a concert hall for performances.

 Odeon

Toilets

The toilets are aligned along the walls and there was a drainage system under the toilets which is really far down!

Toilets

Temple of Hadrian

This is one of the best preserved and most beautiful structures on Curetes Street. It was built before 138AD by
P. Quintilius and was dedicated to Emperor Hadrian.

Temple of Hadrian

The State Agora

It was mainly used as a political centre where governmental discussions were carried out

The State Agora

The Aqueduct of Sextilius Pollio

This two storied conduit brought water to Ephesus from Marnas. It is a 3.5km long structure

The Aqueduct of Sextilius Pollio

Religious Value

Ephesus was an important enough city for early Christianity, that the third ecumenical council was held there in A.D 431.

It was the site of St. Paul’s ministry  for 3 years.

Do you know?????

Slaves sat and heated the toilet stone before the rich people used them

The Celsius Library in Ephesus was the third largest library in the ancient world and had a capacity of 12,000 scrolls and was given as a present to Cleopatra from Marc Anthony.

Ephesus is considered the greatest outdoor museums of Turkey and yet it’s not 100% excavated.

Famous motto of, “an individual can and can “not” step into the same river twice“, was from one of the early philosophers Heraclitus who was born in Ephesus.

The first advertisement in antiquity, was to show which way to the brothel.

The first advertisement in antiquity

 

End

Ephesus was completely abandoned by the 15th century and nearby Ayasulug was renamed Selcuk in 1914.

 

 

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